Feb 03 2012

Twitter Link Round-Up: Environmental Mentions in the State of the Union and Pythons Decimate Everglades Mammals

Published by under News

Photo by Kelci Block

Afraid you missed something interesting in the world of environmental law?  Read on for a (non-comprehensive) list of articles posted on our Twitter feed @WMELSBlog.

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Jan 27 2012

Twitter Link Round-Up: Seaweed Could be the Next Alternative Fuel and Obama Rejects Keystone XL Pipeline

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Photo by Kelci Block

Afraid you missed something interesting in the world of environmental law?  Read on for a (non-comprehensive) list of articles posted on our Twitter feed @WMELSBlog.

Comments Off on Twitter Link Round-Up: Seaweed Could be the Next Alternative Fuel and Obama Rejects Keystone XL Pipeline

Sep 23 2011

Twitter Link Round-Up: FWS Makes New Strategy for Saving Turtles and Scientists on Trial in Italy for Failing to Predict Earthquake

Published by under News

Photo by Kelci Block

 

Afraid you missed something interesting in the world of environmental law?  Read on for a (non-comprehensive) list of articles posted on our Twitter feed @WMELSBlog.

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Apr 20 2011

One Year Later: The BP Oil Spill

Published by under Energy,Water/Maritime

Anchor-handling tugboats battle the blazing remnants of the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon, via wikimedia

Today is the one year anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  On that fateful day, eleven people lost their lives in the explosion on the rig and seventeen more were injured.  This then touched off a disastrous oil leak from the blown wellhead that brought words like “blowout preventer” and “dispersant” into our collective understanding.  Speeches were made and hearings held in Congress as lawmakers attempted to get to the cause.  Meanwhile, attempts to stop the relentless flow of oil continued for months and workers in the Gulf of Mexico were frantically trying to keep the oil offshore and out of the wetlands, with limited success.  When the well was finally capped, the future of the Gulf of Mexico was uncertain.

One year later, the Minerals Management Services is no more, replaced by the unfortunately named Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and Enforcement (BOEMRE).  BOEMRE is setting a breakneck pace trying to balance pressure from the industry to get permits approved and environmentalists worried about another spill.  The oil in the Gulf is still around and recently there has been a rash of mysterious dolphin deaths, with dead baby dolphins washing up on the beaches.  Residents and scientists still worry that large oil plumes may exist underwater, sink to the seafloor, create “dead zones” for fish, and affect crab and shrimp harvests.  If anything, this anniversary is a reminder that the full effects of this disaster have not been fully felt or understood yet and we should not forget that. Continue Reading »

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Dec 03 2010

Twitter Link Round-Up for Dec. 3, 2010

Published by under News

Photo by Kelci Block

Afraid you missed something interesting in the world of environmental law?  Read on for a list of articles posted on our Twitter feed @WMELSBlog.

– NYT: Deforestation in Brazil has dropped and so has greenhouse gas emissions due to greener government policies http://bit.ly/h4P04n
– NYT
: 16 Senators from corn-producing states are pushing to keep ethanol subsidies in place http://bit.ly/dRnxr1
– SA
: A new study shows that sea level rises threaten coastal wetlands more than previously thought http://bit.ly/hPSho5
– NYT: Tax breaks for energy companies may be slashed, but its unclear if alt energy subsidies might also be cut http://nyti.ms/gbUaCB

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Nov 19 2010

Show Me the Numbers: Florida Water Quality Fight

Published by under Water/Maritime

Indian River Lagoon, Source: University of Florida

A lawsuit in 2008 brought by the Florida Wildlife Federation against the EPA resulted in a settlement requiring the EPA tomake more definite standards for nitrogen and phosphorous pollution allowed in Florida waterways.  Upon review of hte claim, the EPA decided that numerical standards would be required to bring Florida into compliance with the Clean Water Act.  The suit was settled with this decision and the agency has been working on the new standards.  Currently, Florida uses what’s called a “narrative standard” as a guide to limiting pollution in the waterways, but the new EPA standards are now being finalized and are expected to take effect soon.  More information about the new standards and reactions to them are below.

NY Times: “Last-Minute Lobbying Over EPA’s Water-Quality Rules for Fla. Focuses on Costs”

Both sides in the fight over U.S. EPA’s effort to impose tough new water quality standards in Florida’s fresh water bodies lobbied aggressively in these final weeks before Sunday, the agency’s deadline to sign the new regulation.

There was no sign today that deadline would change, despite the outcry from Florida delegates, state officials and industry groups that the cost to comply with the federally mandated pollution limits would suffocate taxpayers, farmers and businesses in a state already hard-hit by the recession.

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